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Hannibal “Mukozuke” Review (2×05)

29 Mar

Hannibal-TV-Series-image-hannibal-tv-series-36794557-3000-1997

Hannibal Lecter is a fascinating character, but it’s extremely difficult to sympathize with him after we see what’s been done to Beverly. He still possesses a certain amount of humanity, but there’s no denying that he’s also a monster, someone who’d slice Bev up and display her as a form of grotesque, unsettling art.

He isn’t careless, though, nor does he take risks that will most likely end up harming him more than helping him; this is the fundamental difference between him and Will Graham, and the show deftly conveys this difference in tonight’s episode. We knew Will wouldn’t get away with his plan, but this conflict is so, so, interesting because it illustrates the power he wields from behind his prison cell, the advantage he has over Hannibal because he’s willing to do whatever it takes to kill him. That’s not to say being in a prison cell provides him with that advantage or that his desire for revenge isn’t detrimental to himself; interestingly, killing Hannibal right then and there would pretty much squash Will’s chances of getting out of prison. The key thing here is that at the end of the episode, Hannibal’s placed into a position of vulnerability that we’ve never seen him in before, and it’s done so through Jonathan Tucker’s Matthew Brown.

Hugh Dancy does an excellent job in his scenes with Brown and Gideon, portraying a man who’s hellbent on revenge, who’s taken on the role of the aggressor now, powerful in his unpredictability and as an expert manipulator. Will sees what he’s become, and that manifests itself in the stag imagery or the water from his sink transforming into blood. He’s become Hannibal. He has the ability to kill. Hannibal’s the one strung up in a Christ pose at the end of the episode; Hannibal, the devil, almost served (heh) as a sacrifice with one kick of a bucket.

“Mukozuke” utilizes some really nice imagery throughout, the most sickening being Beverly’s crime scene at the beginning. If there’s any way to describe our characters’ situations in relation to each other, “in pieces” would be the perfect description, just as Bev is. This is also the first time in this episode that we see the dripping blood, which, as mentioned above, shows up again in Will’s cell. It’s almost like a reminder, a reminder of the consequences that result from his dangerous transformation. It’s a reminder of those who we’ve lost and those who’ve been consumed by desire or hunger or revenge. It’s a reminder of those who’ve ended up on Hannibal Lecter’s plate, and now, those who’ve ended up on Will Graham’s.

GRADE: A-

OTHER THOUGHTS:

-Zeller and Price’s reactions are pretty devastating.

-Hey, Freddie Lounds is here.

-Sound design is just excellent tonight, as always.

-Raul Esparza is just brilliant as Dr. Chilton. His character isn’t one I’d normally find likeable, but Esparza’s handling the character perfectly. “I suppose I was wrong.” Amazing delivery.

-Well, we get Mads Mikkelsen and Jonathan Tucker shirtless.

-Alana’s also looking really beautiful in this episode. Speaking of, HOLY SHIT IS THAT ALANA AND HANNIBAL HOOKING UP IN THE PREVIEW FOR NEXT WEEK WHAT IS THIS I DON’T EVEN. Sorry. I’m intrigued and I do want Dhavernas to have a bigger role this year, but I’m also fearing for her safety now. Hopefully this is all a dream.

-Hey, Will Graham gets the whole mask treatment. Remind you of anything?

-Here’s Hettiene Park’s response to racism/sexism accusations after her character’s death last week. It’s very insightful and fun to read. http://yellowbird66.wordpress.com/2014/03/25/racism-sexism-and-hannibal-eat-the-rude/

Photo credit: NBC, Hannibal

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One Response to “Hannibal “Mukozuke” Review (2×05)”

  1. Michele Donahoe March 29, 2014 at 5:29 pm #

    I absolutely love this show. So do my co-workers. Every Sat. Morn (now) firs this said is ” did you see Hannibal last night”. My kids and Grandchildren love it too.Great show!

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